#MontanaBoss Friday: Stacy Townsend of Townsend Collective

Happy Friday, boss! A day of lazily closing out the week, chatting with your co-workers (aka your pets) about your weekend plans, and hopefully closing up shop juuuust a little early. Each Friday, we'll be doing a feature on an amazing creative business owner in the Big Sky State, so that we can all learn a little bit more about the struggle and the awesomeness of being a business owner. Click here to read other interviews with amazing women from around the state!

Hey girl hey! Introduce yourself and tell us about your biz!

I'm Stacy Townsend of Townsend Collective. Townsend Collective is a three-part business offering branding & graphic design, professional photography and jewelry design.

How did you start your boss lady journey?

I have always felt that I would start my own company at some point, but I was never sure what it would be, or how it would come to fruition. A little over a year ago, I couldn't imagine continuing to work with my employer at the time, and beyond that, couldn't imagine what "real job" would leave me fulfilled. At that point, I decided to lean on my abilities as a graphic designer and photographer to fill my days and hopefully my bank account (with a little jewelry design added to the mix).

Have you gone full-time with your business?

Unfortunately, I was busy pouring 110% into every job I ever had, which never left the time (or the energy) to truly focus on a freelance career on the side. I quit working for "the man" last October, and have been full-time ever since.

Okay, let's talk about the DNA behind Townsend Collective. Were you one of those women with entrepreneurship basically in your blood that we always hear about?

Entrepreneurship is 100% in my DNA. I knew it would happen eventually, I just wasn't sure how.

How do you build an income and a life through Townsend Collective?

Graphic Design - 50%, Photography - 30%, Jewelry Design - 20%

What do you LOVE about being your own boss?

Well, that's an interesting question to answer after spending my Saturday in the office.  But the answer?  Everything. The good AND the bad, but mostly the freedom. Not in the "I take days off and hit happy hour whenever I want" sort of way (although, that's pretty great when it happens). The freedom that I appreciate most is getting to build my business the way I want. There's no blueprint.  No protocol.  Nobody else determining what fits in my job description, or what's above or below my pay grade. When I should work, and when I should go home.  If it's worth it to put in a couple extra hours on a project or not.  

The best part, is that every project is more than a "job." It's a new challenge, and there is always great purpose.  As a designer, I feel lucky to help people bring their dreams to life.  And as a photographer, to capture the monumental moments in life.  The pressure is high, but it's also so incredibly rewarding.  I struggle to find the words to describe what it feels like to hear a client squeal with delight when they see a design that perfectly fits their vision, or for someone see an image from their wedding day that takes their breath away and reminds them of just what it felt like to say "I do," or to see someone wear a piece of jewelry every single day because it's their favorite.  I haven't found a lot of situations in life life that bring me that kind of joy, and now I get to experience it often.  

So, the answer? Everything.

What was your most expensive mistake?

My most expensive mistake is a mistake I continue to make. I am constantly putting my own business development on hold while I focus on each of my clients' needs, and do myself a disservice by doing so.

What's the biggest misconception that women have around business ownership?

The sweatpants? Yes, the sweatpants. It's not all ankle boots & fancy business meetings. Sometimes it's long days, making it work, while somehow, you're still in sweatpants. The hustle is real.

 Stacy Townsend photographing like a champ!

Where would you like to be in the next year? The next five years?

In another year, I would love to be booked out at least two months. In five years, I would love to either have a well developed jewelry line with great retail channels deserving of my full-time attention - OR - to have a client list and active projects that allow more collaboration with (or possibly the hiring of) more designers.

How would you define a Boss Lady?

A creative and passionate ladypreneur who isn't afraid to collaborate with, support and motivate her tribe as she bosses her biz.

What one piece of advice would you give yourself in your first year as a biz owner?

You got this. (Editor's Note: PREACH!)

Want to get in touch with Stacy? Check her out on her website. Send her an email and tell her how you found out about her (*cough* The #MontanaBoss feature *cough*)

(P.S. Want to share your story with other Montana business owners? Click here.)

#MontanaBoss Friday: Tori Pintar of Tori Pintar Photography

Happy Friday, boss! A day of lazily closing out the week, chatting with your co-workers (aka your pets) about your weekend plans, and hopefully closing up shop juuuust a little early. Each Friday, we'll be doing a feature on an amazing creative business owner in the Big Sky State, so that we can all learn a little bit more about the struggle and the awesomeness of being a business owner. Click here to read other interviews with amazing women from around the state!

 Tori Pintar from Tori Pintar Photography

Tori Pintar from Tori Pintar Photography

Hey girl hey! Introduce yourself and tell us about your biz!

Hi! I'm Tori Pintar of Tori Pintar Photography. I'm a Wedding photographer for couples who break the rules because they want a wedding that reflects who they are and the love they have for one another AND the love they have for those dearest to them. For the moms and dads that are rule breakers and raising future rule breakers I also love to spend a morning with them capturing real, chaotic and beautiful family life.

How did you start your boss lady journey?

Accidentally. You might laugh at that, but really. I didn't realize I'd crossed the threshold of self-employed and entrepreneurship until I'd been all in for six or nine months, maybe even a year.

Specifically, people who cared about me helped to create opportunities for me to pursue my passion as a business. They'd noticed just how much I loved taking photographs of people and how fascinated I was with the creativity in the wedding industry and two key things happened.

A friend who did event planning connected me with a couple who couldn't afford photography in a traditional sense and they hired inexperienced me. I pulled an all-nighter to make a slideshow in iPhoto of my 'portfolio' paired with terrible, sappy music to get the job.

On the day, I worked 15 hours for $300.00 and I loved every minute of it. I thought that was so much money!

Then, my uncle connected me to Kene Sperry of Eye in the Sky Photography. This is when serendipity really stepped in, because for the first time, Kene was looking to expand and add a studio manager and possible associate photographer. I worked for free for him that summer to make sure I was the person he hired.

Getting my first paid job was huge, because the idea of being paid to do something I loved seemed impossible and something that 'other' people do. Teaming up with Kene, I found an incredible mentor, learned so much about business and realized that I wanted to run my own, and being a business owner was just as exciting and fulfilling as the photography.

Have you gone full-time with your business?

I pursued payment for my wedding photography services because it felt like the only option for me. Photography was my passion. I was living, breathing and sleeping it.

Fortunately, I found out that I also really liked being a boss lady. Building a brand and a service and experience driven business was fascinating to me and presented constant challenges that kept me on my toes.

At some point, I transitioned mentally from I need to do this passion project to I'm going to build a successful business and life doing something I love. I was hooked by the self-employment beast, but I still hadn't taken complete ownership.

After about two and a half years since I'd made my first $300, I hired a business coach. I was scared to break away from Eye in the Sky and sad to leave such a great team, but deep down I knew that I had to take the reigns and complete responsibility of my business.

Kene and I both knew it and we mutually decided I'd become full time Tori Pintar Photography about two and a half years ago.

How do you build an income and a life through Tori Pintar Photography?

Each calendar year I photograph 15-20 weddings and about 15 families. I will occasionally take on other projects for past clients and local community members that range from event photography to portraits at the school if they're the right fit for me or I need the additional income.

What do you LOVE about being your own boss?

The responsibility.

As much as I'm sometimes terrified that it's all me, I love that I have moments where I look at the clothes hanging in my closet, some of which are actually kind of nice now, and I think I bought those with the money that I--painstakingly at times--made.

Or I recently, joined a wine club, something five or even one year ago would have been impossible. And while it only costs about $200 a year, it feels like such a big deal that I was able to make that happen with out any sort of traditional employment. My family is fairly conservative in a lot of ways, and I've always been the walking to the beat of her own drum member, so I've found huge empowerment in living a life that feels authentic to me but still being able to successfully (at times) adult.

I get bored easily. I couldn't live in southern California anymore for a lot of reasons, but the perfect 80 degree days in December and May and October are high up there on the list. That consistent weather was just so boring to me!

Being a boss lady, I wake up challenged almost every day. The possibilities of what we can do with our businesses, the directions we can take them, the changes we can make, simultaneously excite and overwhelm me.

As the years in business increase, I'm getting more sunk in to the excitement however, because I've also realized that the endless possibilities and choices we make for our businesses most are not permanent. It's ok to test something out and not have it work out or to have something start as an orange and turn into a watermelon. This shift in mindset makes me ecstatic about all the things I can do with my business!

What was your most expensive mistake?

Hiring someone to manage my SEO and not managing them and their progress. I paid them a small fortune for almost a year and I'm on page 5 for my keywords and I'm one of two wedding photographers who reside in Big Sky physically and my website doesn't come up on page one for Big Sky Wedding Photographers.

I tricked myself with the game of being 'busy' into thinking I didn't have time to mitigate this situation or manage my SEO another so I hoped it would just get better.

Really I was just avoiding the tough confrontation of firing them and sharing my truthful experience with a fellow business owner and admitting I had wasted so much money. I've made similar financial mistakes because of 'being' busy but I've found I'm often just avoiding something that is confusing to me which then turns into fear of the unknown and inaction. Taxes are a good example!

What's the biggest misconception that women have around business ownership?

That you're going to wake up on day one and have this beautiful routine where you run in the morning, make a nice breakfast, have a cup of tea, work for eight productive uninterrupted hours with maybe a long lunch in there and then finish for the day and mentally leave your 'work' behind you.

And when you fail at this, that there is something wrong with you and you should beat yourself up about it. Figuring out your working life, routine and habits is one of the biggest challenges to being self-employed.

No one can tell you exactly how to do this. There is no secret formula. Which is both amazing and frustrating. You literally get to build every piece of what your day to day life looks like (yay!) and you literally have to figure out through trial and error, a lot of tears and days in your pajamas with teeth you haven't brushed at 3pm what every piece of your day to day looks like.

Where would you like to be in the next year? The next five years?

With more boxes on my to do list and project list checked off.

I'm on a mission this year to finish things. My mantra is done is better than perfect! Perfection has been halting me in my tracks so I'm trying to just do. Each day I want to accomplish more little things by letting go of so much of the minutiae.

For example a Facebook post that might have taken 15 minutes, now takes 5. In the grander project scheme of things, I have a list of ideas I've wanted to make happen in my business, some of them going on 4 years now, I'd love to look back and have accomplished or at least tried out 3-5 of those.

When I think about five years, I hope I've attempted and completed some really big projects. I have one I'm in the brainstorming stages of now and it's a personal project but it could create some financial/business opportunities in the future. Right now, I'm doing it just for me and I want to keep the focus that way but I know the personal project connects to my core values and passions which will have long term benefits.

What one piece of advice would you give yourself in your first year as a biz owner?

Year One: Don't be afraid to try out a lot things and see what works for you. You don't have to get it right the first or 15th time. Just pick somewhere to start and start even if it is just baby steps. Those steps add up. I promise.

Year Three: Stop working all the time! Go outside. Make a date to hang out with friends and keep it no matter what. Life is both short and long. Short so make the most of it with the people you love but long in that if you don't do this one project today or this month, you have time do it next month. Friends, life, love, joy, you need those to be your best boss lady self.

Want to get in touch with Tori? Check her out on her website. Send her an email and tell her how you found out about her (*cough* The #MontanaBoss feature *cough*)

(P.S. Want to share your story with other Montana business owners? Click here.)

How to Become a Wedding Planner: A #MontanaBoss Interview with Leslie Lukas of Lukas Trudeau Event Co.

Happy Friday, boss! A day of lazily closing out the week, chatting with your co-workers (aka your pets) about your weekend plans, and hopefully closing up shop juuuust a little early. Each Friday, we'll be doing a feature on an amazing creative business owner in the Big Sky State, so that we can all learn a little bit more about the struggle and the awesomeness of being a business owner. Click here to read other interviews with amazing women from around the state!

 How to become a wedding planner, photo by Leslie Lukas

Hey girl hey! Introduce yourself and tell us about your biz!

I'm Leslie Lukas of Lukas Trudeau Event Co. I own, with my business partner, Lukas Trudeau Event Co--a full service design and event planning firm catering to destination weddings and events and corporate experience events.  We provide full service design, decorating and fresh flowers along with concept to completion planning--creating a seamless experience for our clients and their guests.  

How did you start your boss lady journey?

Ultimately, floral design is my passion.  

I moved to Montana in 1998 after training with some magnificent shops in Washington state for 6 years. When I first arrived in our area, I worked in 2 different flower shops between Bozeman and Livingston--making the commute each day (editor's note: That's a hefty commute!).  

Having a strong background in design, the shops just weren't progressive enough for me (imagine FTD style bouquets on a daily basis) so I made the decision to start my own flower shop out of my house.  

So, yeah, I was THAT girl that started out of my garage (living only 6 miles from Chico Hot Springs) didn't hurt either, as I had a built in clientele base for my work and made fast friends there.  

Not soon after, I printed the first sheet of business cards on my dot-matrix printer, made a few strategic phone calls to tell the world what I was up to, and then BOOM!  People were calling me out of the wood work!  I was traveling into the Yellowstone Club weekly, doing flowers at Chico and the Crazy Mountain Ranch, and started with 6 weddings that first year, then doubled each year after that.

About 2 years into my garage floral days, I realized my clients wanted much more than just flowers.  My clients were coming from all over the world to be married in Montana and NO ONE, I mean NO ONE was doing wedding planning except a few church organizers and a woman from NY named Anita Pagliaro (I envied her style so much)!  I wanted to be her because she was so organized and creative.

Anita had me do flowers for some of her events, which I was delighted to do. There was an opportunity and need for event planners and stylish florists right then because at the time, there was a small boom happening in Bozeman....and I took advantage of the timing.  

Martha Stewart Weddings had become all the craze, so I dove into every book and magazine she had ever published, I aligned myself with incredible vendors, seeking the best, and made a ton of mistakes and celebrated successes along the way!  Never in my wildest dreams did I think my work would end up in the pages of BRIDES magazine, Martha Stewart Weddings, The Knot, and so many more.

You could say I was a pioneer of custom floral and planning companies in Montana.  I quickly grew out of my garage, and decided Bozeman would be my hub, and had a swanky space downtown called the Floral Gallery. 

Lots has happened between now and then, including 2 kids, 18 years of marriage, 3 different business names and branding, and making the best decision ever to join forces with Angela Trudeau (formerly of Fresh Designs) in year 17.

It's been a great ride and I can safely say I am still doing what I love.

Have you gone full-time with your business?

I was full-time right off the bat.  I knew that to make a living at event planning and floral, you have to do it full-time.  Working out of a garage, dabbling in a wedding here and an event there; I just knew I would never make enough money to reach my goals and it would be just a hobby.  The demand was also there, so I took advantage of that. 

 Creative business owner in Montana, creative business, female entrepreneur Montana, woman-owned business in Montana

Okay, let's talk about the DNA behind Lukas Trudeau. Were you one of those women with entrepreneurship basically in your blood that we always hear about?  

I am one with a passion for entrepreneurship and working for myself. Floral design and planning is something I am good at, and I LOVE working with people!  I am a social person through and through, and the path I chose feeds that part of me. 

How do you build an income and a life through Lukas Trudeau?

I make my money by making good business decisions, selling our planning services and flowers for top dollar and fair margin (that matches our experience) and providing the products and services that live up to it.

Never being afraid to pull back when something isn't working. For our business, we keep changing it up and watching the market. We find it important to research good sources and watch trends in town, while keeping an eye on our competitors. It's important for us to keep our name out there and stay relevant.  

Being authentic helps tremendously....as does trust. Not only trusting my gut but also making sure my clients trust me. It's important for us to do an amazing job for our clients and to build great relationships in the community.

A good example of making a bold business decision is letting our office in the Baxter Hotel go after three years.  We currently have two warehouses on top of the office, and while we can afford all of it, we just do not use the office enough to justify it.

So far, the emails and phone calls have not stopped and we seldom have drop-in clients. It's just smart business to save that money!  

 How to become a wedding planner in Montana

What was your most expensive mistake?

My most expensive mistake was growing my company too fast in 2002 without a plan. I ended up saying yes to every job.  I didn't realize how much my expenses would grow with insurance, added employees, more product, and made an even bigger mistake of not raising my profit margins.  

I was being too nice and undervaluing my product and was charging my clients the same as if I was still back in my garage doing flowers instead of someone that now had a brick and mortar shop.  An expensive mistake, but I did recover from it the next year.  Now with all the reality shows, podcasts and resources (which we did not have then!  or boss ladies!) no one should be making those kinds of mistakes!

What's the biggest misconception that women have around business ownership?

That you have to have a business plan.  I started my company without one (well, it was jotted on a old notepad), but as primitive as it was, it was enough.  

Sometimes, just taking the leap and getting your idea out there before someone else does is more important than the plan. Just don't get caught up on how shiny that plan is or how proper.

While it is nice to have a plan from the start, and some loans and grants require the shiny version and because you will need money to start your business, it just wasn't necessary for the type of business that I wanted to open.

Now I write mini business plans around things I would like to try, such as pop up shops or other products. When the numbers don't crunch out to where I would like to see them, I let the idea go.  

Where would you like to be in the next year? The next five years?

I am content in the now. Change can happen rapidly in business, so being in the now and present is so important to my work. In five years, I hope to be passing the torch to another go-getter who wants to take our company into the next decade of existence, hoping to have built a brand that people rely on.  

How would you define a Boss Lady?

A Boss Lady is a driven woman who decided to take a leap of faith, wave her magic wand, and follow her dreams and not let anyone or anything get in her way. 
 

 Business owner in Montana, creative business owner Mountain West

What one piece of advice would you give yourself in your first year as a biz owner? How about year 3?

Year one....don't forget to eat...and breath.  Year 3....see year one.  (but seriously, always take time for yourself no matter what and don't forget those around you who are helping you achieve your dreams--gratitude goes a long way!)

Want to get in touch with Leslie? Check her out on their website. Send her an email and tell her how you found out about her (*cough* The #MontanaBoss feature *cough*)

(P.S. Want to share your story with other Montana business owners? Click here.)

#MontanaBoss Friday: Julia Yanker of Life Untethered Coaching

Montana Boss Friday_Julia.jpg

Happy Friday, boss! A day of lazily closing out the week, chatting with your co-workers (aka your pets) about your weekend plans, and hopefully closing up shop juuuust a little early. Each Friday, we'll be doing a feature on an amazing creative business owner in the Big Sky State, so that we can all learn a little bit more about the struggle and the awesomeness of being a business owner. Click here to read other interviews with amazing women from around the state!

Hey girl hey! Introduce yourself and tell us about your biz!

I'm Julia Yanker of Life Untethered Coaching. I'm a transformational life coach who helps entrepreneurs and other professionals launch their business and navigate their career while maintaining healthy work-life balance and operating effectively from a low-stress zone.

How did you start your boss lady journey?

"Go big or go home" was a phrase I had always heard about, but never fully understood until a pivotal moment in the mountains a few years ago that has shaped my life since then. I was bored to tears at my office job, and KNEW something bigger was calling me…but I didn’t know what it was yet. In a flash of insight after reading a blog, I knew that I was being called to coach people. I was terrified. I was doubtful. I was completely sure I had to do this. I had walked such a long path of personal transformation that I felt a knowingness within me that this was the same work I was meant to guide others through. So I decided to go big, because I wasn’t ready to stay home anymore. (Editor's note: Sounds like a "year of unrest" to me, which is the BEST year! Read about the cycle of years)

Have you gone full-time with your business?

I'm still working part-time at my other job and do a lot of personal work to maintain a healthy attitude towards that job. Otherwise, it can be frustrating! I support the Board of Directors for the non-profit I work for in Bozeman.

Okay, let's talk about the DNA behind Life Untethered. Were you one of those women with entrepreneurship basically in your blood that we always hear about?

Both. I've always had an entrepreneurial spirit. As the child of immigrants to the U.S., I knew that if I wanted something, I needed to find a way to get the money to make it work. But starting a business is a lot of work and can be discouraging, at times. So even with that entrepreneurial drive, it wouldn't have been enough to keep me going in the tough times. If it wasn't for the passion I have for personal transformation and helping others to be their best selves, I would have quit long ago.

How do you build an income and a life through Life Untethered?

All the money I make in my business stays in my business, and the non-profit pays my bills. I also have a super supportive husband who is on board with the personal sacrifices we've both had to make to make this a reality. This year, after 1.5 years in business, I'm anticipating enough income that I can start using my business to support me while I wean myself off the other job. I'm blessed to have the other work I do have - it's very flexible and exactly what I need right now.

What was your most expensive mistake?

Not putting myself out there to be ABLE to make expensive mistakes! I think my business would have grown much more rapidly if I had put myself out there more.

What's do you think is biggest misconception that women have around business ownership?

In my opinion, it's this subtle, unconscious belief that it HAS to be hard. You can start a business and have excellent quality of life! It doesn't have to be stressful for you, damaging to your relationships, or keep you from doing other things you love.

Where would you like to be in the next year? The next five years?

By next year, I will be making the same amount of money from my business to cover what the non-profit pays me. In 5 years, I will be working 4 days a week and hosting wilderness retreats, have a full-fledged program, and will be making a big impact in the community.

How would you define a Boss Lady?

She's got the lady balls to go out and do whatever she wants, regardless of how others view her or what they think about her or her ideas.

What one piece of advice would you give yourself in your first year as a biz owner?

Year 1: Put yourself out there! Take big risks and be ok with failure. Failure isn't truly failing, it's simply data that you use to guide your actions and decisions in the future. It's not truly failure until you allow it to stop you, and you quit.

Year 3: Trust the process. Trust that the right things will appear at the right time. You are bound to be successful, just keep going...you don't have to know what the rest of the path looks like, all you have to do is take the next step that's obvious to you...no matter how small it is.

Want to get in touch with Julia? Say hey to her on Facebook and tell her how you found out about her (*cough* The #MontanaBoss feature *cough*)

(P.S. Want to share your story with other Montana business owners? Click here.)

#MontanaBoss Friday: Cassidy Wendell, The Wellness Rookie

Happy Friday, boss! A day of lazily closing out the week, chatting with your co-workers (aka your pets) about your weekend plans, and hopefully closing up shop juuuust a little early. Each Friday, we'll be doing a feature on an amazing creative business owner in the Big Sky State, so that we can all learn a little bit more about the struggle and the awesomeness of being a business owner. Click here to read other interviews with amazing women from around the state!

Hey girl hey! Introduce yourself and tell us about your biz!

I'm Cassidy Wendell, the Wellness Rookie. I am a holistic health coach, personal trainer and blogger living in beautiful Bozeman, Montana. I help everyday women make sense of the BS surrounding health and fitness by giving out the rookie advice you need from the wellness expert you can relate to.

How did you start your boss lady journey?

I didn't always have the right answers.....I was just as stressed, bloated, anxious, and out of shape as the rest of them. I used to think exercise was punishment for what I ate and drank the night before, food was intimidating as hell, and the word "balance" meant the right proportion of vodka to my soda. Uhm can you say major fail??
 

Have you gone full-time with your business?

Not quite. Ever since my dad passed away, I've helped my mom operate the family business; a steakhouse in Cardwell, Montana. She currently has it on the market so the second that place sells I plan on devoting every single waking minute to growing my business.
 

Okay, let's talk about the DNA behind The Wellness Rookie. Were you one of those women with entrepreneurship basically in your blood that we always hear about?

Ever since I could walk, I hated being told what to do. I knew I was destined to be a Boss Lady from the young age of 3. It also stemmed from the fact that every person in my immediate family owns their own business or has in the past. It's definitely in my blood.

What do you LOOOOVE about being your own boss?

I love being my own boss because I'm addicted to the hustle. I'm always after the "what's next?" for my business and secretly love the hard work that goes into it. But the best part? Having the option to take a "me" day or a day off whenever I want. When the hustle and the down time mix together, it's a truly balancing experience.

How do you build an income and a life through The Wellness Rookie?

My income is a definite mix of various avenues. About 40% comes from our family business, 25% from personal training, 25% from health coaching, and the remaining 10% from blogging, online programs, & affiliate marketing.

What was your most expensive mistake?

Not checking into trademarks and copyright laws. Make sure you are the only "you" out there before diving in headfirst.

here would you like to be in the next year? The next five years?

I hope to be out of our family business and doing my health & wellness business full-time. In the next five years, I wish to be working mostly online (blogging, coaching, speaking) where I can become geographically independent.


How would you define a Boss Lady?

In the words of Ronda Rousey, "not a do-nothing B***h" (Editor's note: Yeeeeeaaaaaa!)


What one piece of advice would you give yourself in your first year as a biz owner?

Good things take time. Even though you may have a million things you want to accomplish, it's better to be a pro at one thing than an amateur at several.

Want to get in touch with Cass? Check her out on her website or over on Instagram. Give her a big wave and tell her how you found out about her (*cough* The #MontanaBoss feature *cough*)

(P.S. Want to share your story with other Montana business owners? Click here.)

#MontanaBoss: Introducing our Friday Series

When I moved to Montana in 2012 from New York City, I remember having a HUGE dream to start my own copywriting shop here in Bozeman, grow my influence, make $100k in my first year, and then move back to New York and rent a cute studio in Williamsburg.

Which...didn't really happen. Like, at all.

The one thing that I remember missing the most during my first year here in Montana was theaccess to other entrepreneurs, male or female, either at networking events OR being able to find them and their stories online. I found it so powerful in New York to read someone's about page and their website and then be able to actually go and meet them at a happy hour or a networking event.

Well, since the Boss Lady Bash was launched, I've always wanted to have an online home for women not yet in the community to read about the amazing women that ARE in the community. A way for these women to tell their stories and to really get REAL on the wins and the struggles that happen as an entrepreneur.

So every Friday for as long as I have #bossladies (which is a LOT in this state! Twice the rate of men!), I'll be putting together a little interview series called #MontanaBoss.

I can't WAIT to introduce you to some of the amazing women who are going to come on the blog. We've got florists, investors, bank owners, restaurateurs, and other mega-badass babes on the quest to not only create a business, but to create a life.

Want to get in on the action?

Fill out this questionnaire, and then send me over a few photos. I'll let you know within two weeks when your post goes live!